BOOKSHELF | WORLD LITERATURE | JULY ➢ WHEN LIFE GIVES YOU LULULEMONS ➢ THE PRESIDENT IS MISSING ➢ ADVICE FOR FUTURE CORPSES ➢ HALF GODS ➢ STILL LIVES

 

 

WHEN LIFE GIVES YOU LULULEMONS    

 

– LAUREN WEISBERGER

The latest from The Devil Wears Prada author Lauren Weisberger features one of your favourite characters from Devil: Miranda’s first assistant, Emily Charlton. “Lululemons” picks up where “Prada” left off. Emily has left Runway magazine, moved to Los Angeles and become a more acidic version of herself: chain-smoking, depressed and dissatisfied with her career as a celebrity stylist and image consultant. She knows the Kardashians, Clooney’s and Hadid’s, but when the novel opens at a New Year’s Eve pool party, she’s at her lowest point. She’s also vaguely uneasy about her feckless husband, Miles, who’s standing in an infinity pool with a topless girl on his shoulders. Emily gets a phone call summoning her to New York on a publicity emergency for a rapper named Rizzo, and she seizes the chance to go, thinking, “New York, her first and truest love, awaited.”

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THE PRESIDENT IS MISSING

 

-BILL CLINTON & JAMES PATTERSON

 

Former president Bill Clinton and thriller writer James Patterson have teamed up to write a novel together. The book is officially fiction: the story of a president who disappears as he tries to prevent an apocalyptic cyber attack.

The authors, Bill Clinton and James Patterson, swear it could happen.

Prodded to collaborate by Washington attorney Robert Barnett, who handles book deals for both of them, Clinton and Patterson drew on their respective backgrounds in completing a 500-page novel that topped Amazon’s best-seller list before publication. Patterson is among the world’s most popular and prolific fiction writers, and the novel is a characteristically fast-paced narrative, with brief chapters and dramatic plot turns.

Clinton, a newcomer to novel writing whose previous books include the autobiography ‘My Life,’ didn’t need a lot of research to tell readers what it’s like to sit inside the White House Situation Room or to be briefed on a possible terrorist attack, or to imagine slipping away entirely.

 

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ADVICE FOR FUTURE CORPSES (AND THOSE WHO LOVE THEM): A PRACTICAL PERSPECTIVE ON DEATH AND DYING

 

-SALLIE TISDALE.

 

NYT critic Parul Sehgal calls this “a wild and brilliantly deceptive book” by the writer, palliative-care nurse and Zen Buddhist Sallie Tisdale. Tisdale writes calm but explicit descriptions of dead bodies and the process of decomposition. And she walks readers through every conceivable decision they will have to make about how to handle death. The book “is a putative guide to what happens to the body as it dies and directly after — and how to care for it,” Sehgal writes. “But in its loving, fierce specificity, this book on how to die is also a blessedly saccharine-free guide for how to live.”

 

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HALF GODS

 

– AKIL KUMARASAMY

 

A startlingly beautiful debut, Half Gods brings together the exiled, the disappeared, the seekers. Following the fractured origins and destines of two brothers named after demigods from the ancient epic the Mahabharata, we meet a family struggling with the reverberations of the past in their lives. These ten interlinked stories redraw the map of our world in surprising ways: following an act of violence, a baby girl is renamed after a Hindu goddess but raised as a Muslim; a lonely butcher from Angola finds solace in a family of refugees in New Jersey; a gentle entomologist, in Sri Lanka, discovers unexpected reserves of courage while searching for his missing son.

 

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STILL LIVES

-MARIA HUMMEL

 

1 of 22 New Books to Read This Summer (TIME)
1 of 20 New Books to Read in June (Entertainment Weekly)
1 of 30 Exciting New Books to Add to Your Summer Reading List (Buzzfeed)

Kim Lord is an avant-garde figure, feminist icon, and agent provocateur in the L.A. art scene. Her groundbreaking new exhibition Still Lives is comprised of self-portraits depicting herself as famous, murdered women―the Black Dahlia, Chandra Levy, Nicole Brown Simpson, among many others―and the works are as compelling as they are disturbing, implicating a culture that is too accustomed to violence against women.

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BOOKSHELF | WORLD LITERATURE | JULY