DAILY THREAD | AROUND THE GLOBE | 24th April, 2018 1. FACEBOOK BECOMES A BIT MORE TRANSPARENT 2. EGYPT BEINGS LAW TO STOP TOURISTS BEING HARRASSED 3. 12 YEAR OLD FLEW TO BALI AFTER ROW WITH MOTHER 4. URANUS SMELLS LIKE ROTTEN EGGS

 

FACEBOOK BECOMES A BIT MORE TRANSPARENT

 

Breaking with long-held company policy, Facebook just opened its Community Standards content rulebook to the public. Now you can see the guidelines Facebook says it uses to allow or disallow posts on the social network.

“You should, when you come to Facebook, understand where we draw these lines and what’s OK and what’s not OK,” said Monika Bickert, Facebook vice president of product policy and counterterrorism told Reuters. Bickert said that the standards are constantly evolving, based in part on feedback from more than 100 outside organizations and experts in areas such as counter-terrorism and child exploitation.

“Everybody should expect that these will be updated frequently,” she said.

 


 

EGYPT BEINGS LAW TO STOP TOURISTS BEING HARRASSED

 

For some tourists at Egypt’s renowned archeological sites, being hectored to buy pieces of parchment, a camel ride or an alabaster statue is all part of the experience.

But the harassment might become a thing of the past after parliament approved a law allowing authorities to fine up to EGP10,000 (about Rs 35,000/-) anyone found to be pestering tourists “with the intention of begging or promoting, offering or selling a good or service”.

 


 

 12 YEAR OLD FLEW TO BALI AFTER ROW WITH MOTHER

 

A 12-year-old Australian boy flew to Bali on his own after using his parents’ credit card to book flights following a row with his mother.

Drew told his family he was going to school before getting a train to Sydney airport, where he boarded a flight bound for Perth and then another to Denpasar, Bali’s capital.

 


 

URANUS SMELLS LIKE ROTTEN EGGS

Uranus, the planet found itself at the butt of more jokes today as scientists discovered that the planet’s cloud tops are partly made up of hydrogen sulphide, the same chemical that gives rotten eggs on Earth their disgusting odor.

“If an unfortunate human were ever to descend through Uranus’s clouds, they would be met with very unpleasant and odiferous conditions,” said Patrick Irwin from the University of Oxford, one of the team of scientists who explored the planet’s chemical makeup.